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I want to cook healthy?

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I want to start cooking healthy and gluten free. This will be hard cause I don’t even know how to cook at all! So I am wondering if anyone has any suggestions on healthy cooking APPS???

Fresh vegetables, stir-fried in olive oil. Add gluten-free spices, salt, and pepper.

Dried beans. Soak overnight, cook for about an hour, and drain. Add gluten-free spices, salt, and pepper. There are dozens of varieties of dried beans!

Brown rice. Cook for 30-45 minutes. Add gluten-free spices, salt, and pepper.

Chicken breasts. Slice thin, cook in olive oil and add gluten-free spices, salt, and pepper.

Gluten-free pasta (rice pasta; the brand "Tinkyada" is the best). I like to add a little olive oil and some oregano/basil (you can buy "Italian Seasoning) and salt.

You can add gluten-free pasta or pizza sauces to any of the above. You can add small amounts of low-fat cheese such as mozzarella, parmesan (fresh is best), and provolone. Small amounts of pecans, walnuts, and almonds can add crunch and "good" fat to your dishes.

Eggs. Hardboiled eggs are high protein and relatively low-fat. I still like to fry mine in a little olive oil, though.

Yogurt (I like Greek yogurt) with fresh fruit such as blueberries, bananas, and strawberries added. You can also add a drizzle of honey if you like your yogurt sweeter.

"Gluten free" doesn’t necessarily mean "healthy". There are a lot of highly-processed gluten-free foods out there, and they’re just as bad for you as the "glutenated" kind. They’re OK for occasional, but sparing, use.

You can of course use "vegetable" oil for your frying, but I prefer "light" olive oil, which is suitable for baking and frying. Don’t use "extra virgin" olive oil for this; it’s best for salads.

I am a celiac, and I like to remember "eat fresh and eat naked" when I am cooking. I do have the occasional indulgence, such as gluten-free cookies (Betty Crocker has a GREAT gluten-free boxed cookie mix) and gluten-free cupcakes from a local bakery. Don’t deprive yourself, or you’ll end up gobbling everything in sight some night at 3 am.

Written by admin

August 11th, 2013 at 6:51 am

Posted in Cooking Healthy

5 Responses to 'I want to cook healthy?'

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  1. All the slimming world recipes are great even if you dont want to loose weight the are healthy foods cooked from scratch and 100′s of recipes are available free online with pictures of the finished dish you should check out the site there delicious.
    References :
    slimmingworld member

    Trisha

    11 Aug 13 at 12:40 pm

  2. Fresh vegetables, stir-fried in olive oil. Add gluten-free spices, salt, and pepper.

    Dried beans. Soak overnight, cook for about an hour, and drain. Add gluten-free spices, salt, and pepper. There are dozens of varieties of dried beans!

    Brown rice. Cook for 30-45 minutes. Add gluten-free spices, salt, and pepper.

    Chicken breasts. Slice thin, cook in olive oil and add gluten-free spices, salt, and pepper.

    Gluten-free pasta (rice pasta; the brand "Tinkyada" is the best). I like to add a little olive oil and some oregano/basil (you can buy "Italian Seasoning) and salt.

    You can add gluten-free pasta or pizza sauces to any of the above. You can add small amounts of low-fat cheese such as mozzarella, parmesan (fresh is best), and provolone. Small amounts of pecans, walnuts, and almonds can add crunch and "good" fat to your dishes.

    Eggs. Hardboiled eggs are high protein and relatively low-fat. I still like to fry mine in a little olive oil, though.

    Yogurt (I like Greek yogurt) with fresh fruit such as blueberries, bananas, and strawberries added. You can also add a drizzle of honey if you like your yogurt sweeter.

    "Gluten free" doesn’t necessarily mean "healthy". There are a lot of highly-processed gluten-free foods out there, and they’re just as bad for you as the "glutenated" kind. They’re OK for occasional, but sparing, use.

    You can of course use "vegetable" oil for your frying, but I prefer "light" olive oil, which is suitable for baking and frying. Don’t use "extra virgin" olive oil for this; it’s best for salads.

    I am a celiac, and I like to remember "eat fresh and eat naked" when I am cooking. I do have the occasional indulgence, such as gluten-free cookies (Betty Crocker has a GREAT gluten-free boxed cookie mix) and gluten-free cupcakes from a local bakery. Don’t deprive yourself, or you’ll end up gobbling everything in sight some night at 3 am.
    References :
    Healthcare teaching assistant.

    july

    11 Aug 13 at 1:29 pm

  3. If you are not Celiac patient then gluten free won’t help at all.

    Gluten is found in products containing wheat, barley and rye grain products

    SERVING PORTIONS are the key to healthy eating!! Cooking methods don’t matter so much as serving portions do. Fist size is a good measure for almost everything except salads!

    I am much healthier since I quit buying prepackaged stuff. Frozen veggies and fruits don’t spoil so fast. Natural fats to use for cooking. and red meats. I cannot get away from some flour and corn meal but rarely use them.
    References :

    Nana Lamb

    11 Aug 13 at 2:07 pm

  4. Well, I’d limit the amount of salt and sugar you use. For salt, just OD on other spices, and for sugar, use 1 cup of pulverized dates for 1 cup of sugar, and add extra vanilla extract. Also, you may want to try stevia, which is a natural sweetener, that doesn’t have a lot of sugar. I would also avoid shortening, as it contains cheap oils and use virgin coconut oil for solid fats, and extra virgin olive oil for oils. Don’t use a lot of refined grains such as all purpose flour and switch from white to brown rice (yes, I know, Asians eat a lot of white rice and they’re perfectly fine, but brown rice is still better). Avoid premade foods such as canned beans and frozen pizza crusts, as you can recreate these at home with less sodium. Most breakfast cereals have added sugar, so you might want to stick with one that has less than 4g of sugar (which is a teaspoon) per serving.

    As for gluten free, there’ll pretty be much a result for anything if you google "gluten free ________"

    Here are some examples:

    Cookies made with almond/oat flour
    Brownies made with beans
    Spaghetti squash for spaghetti
    black bean pasta
    Also, they have this product called xanthan gum, which acts like gluten, maybe it’s in the gluten free section of your grocery store, and the package should tell you how to use it.

    Cooking is pretty easy actually, there are a lot of simple dishes such as scrambled eggs, baked chicken, spaghetti, stir fry. Buy a cookbook, and try one of the recipes, usually the steps will be as follows.

    Measure, Cut, Mix, Divide, Heat, Serve.

    Use a liquid measuring cup for liquids and a dry measuring cup for measuring dry ingredients

    Cutting terms include slice, dice, chop, and shred, which are pretty self explanatory

    Mix, don’t over mix batters, don’t under mix whipped cream, etc.

    Divide, usually this can be done with a dry measuring cup, such as portioning cookies, or muffin batter, or patties.

    Heating terms include bake, sauté, fry, boil, steam and microwave, which are also self explanatory. When you sauté, use just enough oil to cover the bottom of the pan. Make sure the temperature is correct, and the dish is cooked for the right amount of time.

    And then serve.
    References :
    A compilation of what I know

    Trajayjay

    11 Aug 13 at 2:21 pm

  5. Going gluten-free isn’t healthy if you don’t have a gluten intolerance. I mean, a GF choco-chip cookie is still a choco-chip cookie, lol. It just different flours with the same fats and chocolate on the inside. If you really want a lot of fresh ideas, I’d read the Magazine out by Dr. Andrew Weil (The Anti-Inflammatory Diet). It’s in the same section as the food and cooking mags. His stuff has helped me feel healthier and I have serious medical conditions. Also, the Vegetarian Times cooking magazines are great. It helps teach you to use veggies properly, and you can always add meat to the recipes if you’re a carnivore. :-) I found a wonderful veggie soup with tons of things in there and I added lamb chunks to it and it was wonderful. But the best way to learn healthy s to learn vegetarian and vegan. Once you learn to balance your fruits and veggies, the rest is easy as pie.
    References :

    Amanda

    11 Aug 13 at 3:11 pm

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